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Fuel Filter

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Big thanks to the fuel filter, dirt, debris, and other impurities are screened from the fuel. Fuel that flows through the engine doesn't carry anything with it. It remains clean and free from contaminants. This, in turn, prevents clog-up in a fuel injection line or carburetor. If the vehicle's filter breaks, engine performance can be at stake. Here are symptoms you should watch out for:

The engine hesitates.

A clogged filter will disrupt the free flow of fuel into the engine. This can lead to engine hesitation or stumbling. When the vehicle accelerates from a stop, that's when this engine problem may usually be noticed or experienced.

The engine idles roughly.

Idling can become rough or erratic in case the fuel filter is clogged or damaged. This is brought about by irregularities in engine combustion. Restrictions in fuel flow can result in a botched up air-fuel ratio.

The vehicle fails to start.

When filled with debris or dirt, the filter may keep fuel from getting through the engine. This will make it difficult for the vehicle to start. A no-start condition is one of the many engine problems caused by a clogged filter, especially in older vehicles that use carburetors.

The engine runs erratically.

A dirt-filled fuel filter can definitely cause some obstruction that keeps the engine from performing at its best. At high speeds, the engine may run perfectly fine until you shift to lower speeds, when the engine may hesitate or stall. Fuel pump pressure is strong during high speeds, while in lower speeds, the pressure may not be enough to push fuel into the engine, past the clogged filter.

The vehicle starts fine but eventually dies out.

Start-and-stop problem may be caused by a dirt-clogged filter. There can be sufficient fuel flow for the engine to start and operate, but fuel flow may eventually be obstructed, causing the engine to die or cut out its power because of the restrictions or obstructions.

How to clean a fuel filter

Step 1: Locate the filter by tracing the fuel line, starting from the fuel injector or carburetor.

Step 2: Seal the hose clamps on the fuel line. The hose clamps should be screwed around 4 inches away from the filter on both ends of the hose. Use a flathead screwdriver to tighten them. The clamps will keep fuel from leaking out.

Step 3: Put a vessel or container underneath the filter before you unscrew the clamps. You have to disconnect the hose from the filter when the clamps are loosened. Collect fuel into the container until the filter is empty.

Step 4: Lead one end of the filter to the container. Put a straw, which comes with the B-12 Chem Tool, to the spray nozzle. The other end should then go into the filter. Once everything is set up, you have to start spraying. This should be done from both sides.

Step 5: Tap the fuel filter. Do this against a hard surface and with gentle force. Alternatively, turning the screwdriver around and tapping the filter with its handle may work.

Step 6: Use the B-12 Chem Tool Spray for blasting the filter. After the filter has dried after about an hour, you can start reconnecting it to the fuel lines.

Fuel Filter Articles

  • Fuel Filter Problems and Solutions

    Big thanks to the fuel filter, dirt, debris, and other impurities are screened from the fuel. Fuel that flows through the engine doesn\'t carry anything with it. It remains clean and free from contaminants. This, in turn, prevents clog-up in a fuel injection line or carburetor. If the vehicle\'s filter breaks, engine performance can be at stake. Here are symptoms you should watch out for:

    The engine hesitates.

    A clogged filter will disrupt the free flow of fuel into the engine. This can lead to engine hesitation or stumbling. When the vehicle accelerates from a stop, that\'s when this engine problem may usually be noticed or experienced.

    The engine idles roughly.

    Idling can become rough or erratic in case the fuel filter is clogged or damaged. This is brought about by irregularities in engine combustion. Restrictions in fuel flow can result in a botched up air-fuel ratio.

    The vehicle fails to start.

    When filled with debris or dirt, the filter may keep fuel from getting through the engine. This will make it difficult for the vehicle to start. A no-start condition is one of the many engine problems caused by a clogged filter, especially in older vehicles that use carburetors.

    The engine runs erratically.

    A dirt-filled fuel filter can definitely cause some obstruction that keeps the engine from performing at its best. At high speeds, the engine may run perfectly fine until you shift to lower speeds, when the engine may hesitate or stall. Fuel pump pressure is strong during high speeds, while in lower speeds, the pressure may not be enough to push fuel into the engine, past the clogged filter.

    The vehicle starts fine but eventually dies out.

    Start-and-stop problem may be caused by a dirt-clogged filter. There can be sufficient fuel flow for the engine to start and operate, but fuel flow may eventually be obstructed, causing the engine to die or cut out its power because of the restrictions or obstructions.

    How to clean a fuel filter

    Step 1: Locate the filter by tracing the fuel line, starting from the fuel injector or carburetor.

    Step 2: Seal the hose clamps on the fuel line. The hose clamps should be screwed around 4 inches away from the filter on both ends of the hose. Use a flathead screwdriver to tighten them. The clamps will keep fuel from leaking out.

    Step 3: Put a vessel or container underneath the filter before you unscrew the clamps. You have to disconnect the hose from the filter when the clamps are loosened. Collect fuel into the container until the filter is empty.

    Step 4: Lead one end of the filter to the container. Put a straw, which comes with the B-12 Chem Tool, to the spray nozzle. The other end should then go into the filter. Once everything is set up, you have to start spraying. This should be done from both sides.

    Step 5: Tap the fuel filter. Do this against a hard surface and with gentle force. Alternatively, turning the screwdriver around and tapping the filter with its handle may work.

    Step 6: Use the B-12 Chem Tool Spray for blasting the filter. After the filter has dried after about an hour, you can start reconnecting it to the fuel lines.