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Lowering Kit

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Lowering a vehicle will not only help your ride achieve that low rider appearance, but it will also improve your car's overall performance. One way to lower a vehicle is by replacing stock springs with lowering springs. Compared to stock springs, lowering springs are much shorter and they also have more coils. These shorten the distance between the car's body and the wheels, and these also increase the tension between the frame of the vehicle and the suspension system. As a result, the vehicle's center of gravity is lessened, so it becomes more responsive and easier to handle. If you want to lower your ride properly, you'd better get the right lowering kit for the task. Here's a quick guide that will help you learn more about lowering kits.

Things to consider

  • Type
  • There are two types of lowering springs.progressive rate and linear rate.and they mainly differ in terms of the gap of their coils. Progressive rate springs have coils with noticeably bigger gaps at the top and bottom while linear rate springs have evenly spaced coils all throughout. Progressive rate springs are ideal for those who want to improve their vehicle's performance and appearance while linear rate springs are best for those who prefer performance over looks.

  • Drop Amount
  • Aside from the type, you should also take into consideration the amount of drop that you want for your ride when buying a lowering kit. Lowering springs come in different lengths (usually in inches) that you can choose from. Note that they're not adjustable, so you'd better choose carefully before buying.

  • Cost
  • To ensure that you get a good product from a brand that you can trust, it would be best to prepare around $500 to $1000. Instead of getting the parts separately, getting a complete lowering kit remains to be the best options because it saves you both time and money.

Step-by-step guide

Here's a general guide on how to install lowering springs. Before you begin the task, make sure that you have purchased the correct lowering kit for the task.

Step 1: Jack the front side of the car up and support it using jack stands. Once the vehicle is secure, remove both of its front wheels.

Step 2: Next, remove the following components from your vehicle: front strut bolts, brake bolts, front sway bar end links, and upper strut assemblies. Refer to your car's manual to locate and avoid causing damage to these components.

Step 3: After that, compress the spring that is located around the strut and take its hat and bump stop off. At this point, you should be able to remove the spring on both sides of the suspension.

Step 4: Mount the new springs on the struts and secure them in place using the bump stop, which should be included in the lowering kit.

Step 5: Compress the new springs and reinstall the components that you removed earlier back to their original position.

Step 6: When you're done with the front, lower the vehicle and then jack up its rear end, repeating the same process until the new rear springs have also been installed.

Lowering Kit Articles

  • Buying and Installing a Lowering Kit Made Easy

    Lowering a vehicle will not only help your ride achieve that low rider appearance, but it will also improve your car\'s overall performance. One way to lower a vehicle is by replacing stock springs with lowering springs. Compared to stock springs, lowering springs are much shorter and they also have more coils. These shorten the distance between the car\'s body and the wheels, and these also increase the tension between the frame of the vehicle and the suspension system. As a result, the vehicle\'s center of gravity is lessened, so it becomes more responsive and easier to handle. If you want to lower your ride properly, you\'d better get the right lowering kit for the task. Here\'s a quick guide that will help you learn more about lowering kits.

    Things to consider

    • Type
    • There are two types of lowering springs-progressive rate and linear rate-and they mainly differ in terms of the gap of their coils. Progressive rate springs have coils with noticeably bigger gaps at the top and bottom while linear rate springs have evenly spaced coils all throughout. Progressive rate springs are ideal for those who want to improve their vehicle\'s performance and appearance while linear rate springs are best for those who prefer performance over looks.

    • Drop Amount
    • Aside from the type, you should also take into consideration the amount of drop that you want for your ride when buying a lowering kit. Lowering springs come in different lengths (usually in inches) that you can choose from. Note that they\'re not adjustable, so you\'d better choose carefully before buying.

    • Cost
    • To ensure that you get a good product from a brand that you can trust, it would be best to prepare around $500 to $1000. Instead of getting the parts separately, getting a complete lowering kit remains to be the best options because it saves you both time and money.

    Step-by-step guide

    Here\'s a general guide on how to install lowering springs. Before you begin the task, make sure that you have purchased the correct lowering kit for the task.

    Step 1: Jack the front side of the car up and support it using jack stands. Once the vehicle is secure, remove both of its front wheels.

    Step 2: Next, remove the following components from your vehicle: front strut bolts, brake bolts, front sway bar end links, and upper strut assemblies. Refer to your car\'s manual to locate and avoid causing damage to these components.

    Step 3: After that, compress the spring that is located around the strut and take its hat and bump stop off. At this point, you should be able to remove the spring on both sides of the suspension.

    Step 4: Mount the new springs on the struts and secure them in place using the bump stop, which should be included in the lowering kit.

    Step 5: Compress the new springs and reinstall the components that you removed earlier back to their original position.

    Step 6: When you\'re done with the front, lower the vehicle and then jack up its rear end, repeating the same process until the new rear springs have also been installed.