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Steering Stabilizer

 Shop Steering Stabilizer

Ever wonder what a steering stabilizer is and what it does? Here's a quick guide that will help you learn about how it works and how you can install one in your ride.

How Steering Stabilizers Work

Function

Also known as steering or spirit dampers, steering stabilizers basically provide support to your vehicle by dampening movement and vibration every time you encounter bumps, holes, and ruts on the road. Much like a shock absorber, a steering stabilizer resists movement using hydraulic friction. It lessens the shock load coming from the tires, prevents oscillation from occurring, and prolongs the life of your vehicle's steering components by reducing their wear and tear. This component is ideal for people who love to go on off-road adventures or those who own vehicles fitted with large tires.

Location

The steering stabilizer is usually installed between the chassis and the center link.

Price

Depending on the brand that you buy, a stabilizer typically costs around $50 to $100.

How to Replace a Steering Stabilizer

If your vehicle has a faulty stabilizer, you won't be protected against the so-called .death wobble.. Keep yourself safe while you drive by replacing your ride's old stabilizers right away. Here's a basic guide that you can follow to get started.

Difficulty level: Moderate

Tools that you'll need:

  • Ratchet
  • Socket set
  • Penetrating fluid
  • Rag

Step 1: Depending on what you drive, you may or may not need to elevate the vehicle to install a steering stabilizer. In some cases, you can install one by merely accessing the engine compartment. So before you start, check your car's manual to determine its would-be location. If you find that you need to elevate your vehicle, use ramps, stands, or a lift, making sure that they are stable. This ensures that your vehicle doesn't roll or fall on you during the process.

Step 2: Access the old stabilizer through the engine compartment or by going under your vehicle. Remember that you're looking for a component that resembles a shock absorber, so it won't be hard to find.

Step 3: Once you've located the stabilizer, find the bolts that are holding it in place and start to spray them with penetrating fluid. This is done to make the removal process much easier. As soon as the penetrating fluid settles, you can start unbolting the part. Note that some stabilizers also have a cotter pin. If yours has, you need to break the pin to be able to remove the part completely.

Step 4: Next, use the rag to wipe the area clean. More often than not, dirt and grime have accumulated in the area, especially if you drive your vehicle off-road.

Step 5: After cleaning the area, position the new stabilizer for installation. Make sure it is perfectly aligned with the mounting holes before you bolt it in place. When attaching the bolts, do not tighten one side right away. Tighten the connection only when both sides of the stabilizer are already bolted in their correct positions.

Steering Stabilizer Articles

  • Steering Stabilizer: Function and Installation

    Ever wonder what a steering stabilizer is and what it does? Here\'s a quick guide that will help you learn about how it works and how you can install one in your ride.

    How Steering Stabilizers Work

    Function

    Also known as steering or spirit dampers, steering stabilizers basically provide support to your vehicle by dampening movement and vibration every time you encounter bumps, holes, and ruts on the road. Much like a shock absorber, a steering stabilizer resists movement using hydraulic friction. It lessens the shock load coming from the tires, prevents oscillation from occurring, and prolongs the life of your vehicle\'s steering components by reducing their wear and tear. This component is ideal for people who love to go on off-road adventures or those who own vehicles fitted with large tires.

    Location

    The steering stabilizer is usually installed between the chassis and the center link.

    Price

    Depending on the brand that you buy, a stabilizer typically costs around $50 to $100.

    How to Replace a Steering Stabilizer

    If your vehicle has a faulty stabilizer, you won\'t be protected against the so-called ?eath wobble.?Keep yourself safe while you drive by replacing your ride\'s old stabilizers right away. Here\'s a basic guide that you can follow to get started.

    Difficulty level: Moderate

    Tools that you\'ll need:

    • Ratchet
    • Socket set
    • Penetrating fluid
    • Rag

    Step 1: Depending on what you drive, you may or may not need to elevate the vehicle to install a steering stabilizer. In some cases, you can install one by merely accessing the engine compartment. So before you start, check your car\'s manual to determine its would-be location. If you find that you need to elevate your vehicle, use ramps, stands, or a lift, making sure that they are stable. This ensures that your vehicle doesn\'t roll or fall on you during the process.

    Step 2: Access the old stabilizer through the engine compartment or by going under your vehicle. Remember that you\'re looking for a component that resembles a shock absorber, so it won\'t be hard to find.

    Step 3: Once you\'ve located the stabilizer, find the bolts that are holding it in place and start to spray them with penetrating fluid. This is done to make the removal process much easier. As soon as the penetrating fluid settles, you can start unbolting the part. Note that some stabilizers also have a cotter pin. If yours has, you need to break the pin to be able to remove the part completely.

    Step 4: Next, use the rag to wipe the area clean. More often than not, dirt and grime have accumulated in the area, especially if you drive your vehicle off-road.

    Step 5: After cleaning the area, position the new stabilizer for installation. Make sure it is perfectly aligned with the mounting holes before you bolt it in place. When attaching the bolts, do not tighten one side right away. Tighten the connection only when both sides of the stabilizer are already bolted in their correct positions.