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Suspension Bushing

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Your vehicle's suspension system is made up of several components that make your drives comfortable and easy to handle. Given this demanding job, some of these components will eventually wear out or get damaged after continued use. When this happens, you'll surely have nothing but hassles on the road. Just take a look at the suspension bushings as an example. If one these small, rubber bushings act up, you'll start to hear thumping or creaking sounds from the rear end of your vehicle. And if left unchecked, these bushings will completely wear out, become squishy, and affect your driving. Address the problem by getting a replacement suspension bushing for your old and faulty one immediately. Replacing this component may take some time as you may need to remove a lot of rear suspension components to access the bushings. Some cars may also require you to remove the gas tank or disconnect the brake lines in order to do the task. Here's a brief and basic guide on how to replace a suspension bushing to get you started.

Tools that you'll need:

  • Jack and jack stands
  • Flathead screwdriver
  • Open end wrenches
  • Torque wrench
  • Vice or clamps

Step 1: To begin, put the floor jack beneath the suspension and raise the rear end of your vehicle. Once it's up, use jack stands to support it.

Step 2: With the vehicle is securely in place, find the rear shock absorbers at the bottom and disconnect them by removing the mounting bolts. After that, examine your vehicle's suspension system and determine if you need to remove the brake lines to drop the suspension. If you do, remove the brake lines before lowering the suspension assembly.

Step 3: When the suspension is lowered, find the faulty suspension bushing in your system and remove the assembly that holds it. This particular step may seem simple but it can actually take a lot of time so be patient when loosening and taking the bolt out.

Step 4: Next, use a clamp to remove the old bushing. Use the clamp to push the busted component out of the assembly. And as soon as the suspension bushing is out, hold the suspension assembly on your work bench using a vice or two clamps.

Step 5: After that, lubricate the new bushings that you bought before installing them. If you upgraded to high-performance types like polyurethane bushings, the kit that you bought should likely include a tube of lubricant. When lubricating a bushing, remember to apply enough grease to help prolong the life of the component and to prevent it from making unnecessary noises while you drive.

Step 6: Next, reassemble the rear bushing assembly by sliding or mounting the new bushings in place and reconnect the bolts, nuts, and washers that you removed earlier back to their original positions.

Step 7: After that, reattach the bushing assembly to your suspension system and then torque the main bolt to seal it. Lastly, take your ride out for a spin and see if the new suspension bushing did the trick.

Suspension Bushing Articles

  • How to Fix a Broken Suspension Bushing

    Your vehicle\'s suspension system is made up of several components that make your drives comfortable and easy to handle. Given this demanding job, some of these components will eventually wear out or get damaged after continued use. When this happens, you\'ll surely have nothing but hassles on the road. Just take a look at the suspension bushings as an example. If one these small, rubber bushings act up, you\'ll start to hear thumping or creaking sounds from the rear end of your vehicle. And if left unchecked, these bushings will completely wear out, become squishy, and affect your driving. Address the problem by getting a replacement suspension bushing for your old and faulty one immediately. Replacing this component may take some time as you may need to remove a lot of rear suspension components to access the bushings. Some cars may also require you to remove the gas tank or disconnect the brake lines in order to do the task. Here\'s a brief and basic guide on how to replace a suspension bushing to get you started.

    Tools that you\'ll need:

    • Jack and jack stands
    • Flathead screwdriver
    • Open end wrenches
    • Torque wrench
    • Vice or clamps

    Step 1: To begin, put the floor jack beneath the suspension and raise the rear end of your vehicle. Once it\'s up, use jack stands to support it.

    Step 2: With the vehicle is securely in place, find the rear shock absorbers at the bottom and disconnect them by removing the mounting bolts. After that, examine your vehicle\'s suspension system and determine if you need to remove the brake lines to drop the suspension. If you do, remove the brake lines before lowering the suspension assembly.

    Step 3: When the suspension is lowered, find the faulty suspension bushing in your system and remove the assembly that holds it. This particular step may seem simple but it can actually take a lot of time so be patient when loosening and taking the bolt out.

    Step 4: Next, use a clamp to remove the old bushing. Use the clamp to push the busted component out of the assembly. And as soon as the suspension bushing is out, hold the suspension assembly on your work bench using a vice or two clamps.

    Step 5: After that, lubricate the new bushings that you bought before installing them. If you upgraded to high-performance types like polyurethane bushings, the kit that you bought should likely include a tube of lubricant. When lubricating a bushing, remember to apply enough grease to help prolong the life of the component and to prevent it from making unnecessary noises while you drive.

    Step 6: Next, reassemble the rear bushing assembly by sliding or mounting the new bushings in place and reconnect the bolts, nuts, and washers that you removed earlier back to their original positions.

    Step 7: After that, reattach the bushing assembly to your suspension system and then torque the main bolt to seal it. Lastly, take your ride out for a spin and see if the new suspension bushing did the trick.