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Blower Motor

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The blower motor isn't just there to keep your vehicle's AC system up and running. It's also designed to prevent the engine from overheating. So once this motor breaks, the chances of your car engine overheating are increased. Fortunately, replacing a busted blower motor is a fairly easy task. Here are the tools you need and the instructions (Step-by-step guide may not be specific to your vehicle, so check with your car manual.):

Tools required:

  • Screwdriver
  • Socket
  • Ratchet
  • Pry tool
  • Electrical tape
  • Silicone sealant

Step 1: Disconnect the battery's negative cable.

Pop up the hood and prop it with a rod. Using a socket wrench, disconnect the battery's negative cable. Secure the cable's end with a strip of electrical tape. Make sure that the cable's metal end doesn't come in contact with the engine or any metal part under the hood.

Step 2: Disconnect the blower motor wires.

The motor is usually placed under the dashboard. However, its exact location depends on your car make and model, so better check with your vehicle manual. Once you've located the motor, look under the glove compartment to locate the trim panel. You'll then see screws attached to this panel. Remove the screws with a screwdriver and pry off the panel from the dashboard with a pry tool. Then disconnect the wire harness with a screwdriver so you could unplug the clamp that holds the electrical connector in place. Once the clamp is removed, you'll be able to easily and safely disconnect the wires.

Step 3: Remove the old motor.

Using a socket and ratchet, loosen and remove the bolts that secure the motor in place. Pull out the motor from the assembly, making sure that you don't pull out or damage nearby components.

Step 4: Install the new blower motor.

Place the new motor in position and apply a bit of sealant on the motor's base, focusing on the rim. Then screw the mounting base onto the housing with a screwdriver.

Step 5: Reinstall the electrical wires, panel, and negative cable.

Reconnect the wiring harness. You'll know the harness plug is properly attached if you hear it click as you push it in position. Reattach the trim panel by screwing it back in place and reattach the battery's negative cable. Double-check all the parts, making sure you've reinstalled everything you removed earlier. Then close the hood and test the newly installed blower motor. A properly installed motor should emit a steady, smooth whirring noise.

Safety and installation tips:

  • Because you'll be handling electrical wires, be sure you're equipped with rubber gloves to protect your hands in case of an electrical mishap.
  • Now is the best time to inspect other blower components for signs of damage. If the damaged component is beyond repair, replace it as soon as possible.
  • In some cases, a malfunctioning motor just needs to be cleaned. Before you yank out the old motor, try to clean it first with a cleaner for electrical parts. If, after cleaning, the motor still won't work, it's busted beyond repair and has to be replaced.

Blower Motor Articles

  • Replacing a Broken Blower Motor in 5 Steps

    The blower motor isn\'t just there to keep your vehicle\'s AC system up and running. It\'s also designed to prevent the engine from overheating. So once this motor breaks, the chances of your car engine overheating are increased. Fortunately, replacing a busted blower motor is a fairly easy task. Here are the tools you need and the instructions (Step-by-step guide may not be specific to your vehicle, so check with your car manual.):

    Tools required:

    • Screwdriver
    • Socket
    • Ratchet
    • Pry tool
    • Electrical tape
    • Silicone sealant

    Step 1: Disconnect the battery\'s negative cable.

    Pop up the hood and prop it with a rod. Using a socket wrench, disconnect the battery\'s negative cable. Secure the cable\'s end with a strip of electrical tape. Make sure that the cable\'s metal end doesn\'t come in contact with the engine or any metal part under the hood.

    Step 2: Disconnect the blower motor wires.

    The motor is usually placed under the dashboard. However, its exact location depends on your car make and model, so better check with your vehicle manual. Once you\'ve located the motor, look under the glove compartment to locate the trim panel. You\'ll then see screws attached to this panel. Remove the screws with a screwdriver and pry off the panel from the dashboard with a pry tool. Then disconnect the wire harness with a screwdriver so you could unplug the clamp that holds the electrical connector in place. Once the clamp is removed, you\'ll be able to easily and safely disconnect the wires.

    Step 3: Remove the old motor.

    Using a socket and ratchet, loosen and remove the bolts that secure the motor in place. Pull out the motor from the assembly, making sure that you don\'t pull out or damage nearby components.

    Step 4: Install the new blower motor.

    Place the new motor in position and apply a bit of sealant on the motor\'s base, focusing on the rim. Then screw the mounting base onto the housing with a screwdriver.

    Step 5: Reinstall the electrical wires, panel, and negative cable.

    Reconnect the wiring harness. You\'ll know the harness plug is properly attached if you hear it click as you push it in position. Reattach the trim panel by screwing it back in place and reattach the battery\'s negative cable. Double-check all the parts, making sure you\'ve reinstalled everything you removed earlier. Then close the hood and test the newly installed blower motor. A properly installed motor should emit a steady, smooth whirring noise.

    Safety and installation tips:

    • Because you\'ll be handling electrical wires, be sure you\'re equipped with rubber gloves to protect your hands in case of an electrical mishap.
    • Now is the best time to inspect other blower components for signs of damage. If the damaged component is beyond repair, replace it as soon as possible.
    • In some cases, a malfunctioning motor just needs to be cleaned. Before you yank out the old motor, try to clean it first with a cleaner for electrical parts. If, after cleaning, the motor still won\'t work, it\'s busted beyond repair and has to be replaced.